Inside the Head of a Collector: Neuropsychological Forces at Play, Shirley M Mueller (Lucia Marquand, August 2019)
Inside the Head of a Collector: Neuropsychological Forces at Play,
Shirley M Mueller (Lucia Marquand, August 2019)

Collecting objects gives enormous pleasure to approximately one third of the population, providing such benefits as intellectual stimulation, the thrill of the chase, and leaving a legacy. On the other hand, the same pursuit can engender pain; for example, paying too much for an object, unknowingly buying a fake, or dealing with the frustrations of collection dispersal.

John Reeves: Pioneering Collector of Chinese Plants and Botanical Art, Kate Bailey (ACC Arts Books, August 2019)
John Reeves: Pioneering Collector of Chinese Plants and Botanical Art, Kate Bailey (ACC Arts Books, August 2019)

This is the story of the Reeves Collection of botanical paintings, the result of one man’s single-minded dedication to commissioning pictures and gathering plants for the Horticultural Society of London.

It has been more than three decades since the passing of the great French economic historian, Fernand Braudel, but his adventurous influence runs deep in Angus Forsyth’s remarkable illustrated essay on the Silk Road—the lanes of transport between East and West that linked China, India, Africa and the Mediterranean before the era of motor vehicles. Braudel’s genius was in his ability to highlight the intimate detail against the grand canvas of history, and his approach to storytelling fundamentally shifted the way history is presented, whether in the curating of museum exhibitions or histories of leaders and transformative events. It’s the detail that counts. 

Andrew Shaw was for many years a “trouble shooter” television journalist in the employ of the BBC. His job required him to pick up and fly to wherever whatever piece of news was breaking. After what many would regard as an enviable pursuit of exhaustive and widely varied paid foreign travel, he tired of it largely because his calling denied him the underlying exotica of his destinations.

From Confinement to Containment: Japanese/American Arts during the Early Cold War, Edward Tang (Temple University Press, February 2019)
From Confinement to Containment: Japanese/American Arts during the Early Cold War, Edward Tang (Temple University Press, February 2019)

During the early part of the Cold War, Japan emerged as a model ally, and Japanese Americans were seen as a model minority. From Confinement to Containment examines the work of four Japanese and Japanese/American artists and writers during this period: the novelist Hanama Tasaki, the actor Yamaguchi Yoshiko, the painter Henry Sugimoto, and the children’s author Yoshiko Uchida. The backgrounds of the four figures reveal a mixing of nationalities, a borrowing of cultures, and a combination of domestic and overseas interests.

China or India? India or China? Maybe Chindia? Anyone who has ever spent much time thinking about the future of the Asia or any particular country or company’s relationship to it, has probably asked this question, and more than once. Several terms, such as “Asia- Pacific” or the newly-launched “Indo-Pacific”, carry this question within it.

Separating Sheep from Goats: Sherman E Lee and Chinese Art Collecting in Postwar America, Noelle Giuffrida (University of California Press, August 2018)
Separating Sheep from Goats: Sherman E Lee and Chinese Art Collecting in Postwar America, Noelle Giuffrida (University of California Press, August 2018)

Separating Sheep from Goats investigates the history of collecting and exhibiting Chinese art through the lens of the career of renowned American curator and museum director Sherman E Lee (1918-2008). Drawing upon artworks and archival materials, Noelle Giuffrida excavates an international society of collectors, dealers, curators, and scholars who constituted the art world in which Lee operated.