Adivasi Art And Activism: Curation in a Nationalist Age, Alice Tilche (Permanent Black, April 2024)
Adivasi Art And Activism: Curation in a Nationalist Age,
Alice Tilche (Permanent Black, April 2024)

As India consolidates an aggressive model of economic development, indigenous tribal people—the Adivasis—continue to be overrepresented among the country’s poor. Adivasis make up more than eight hundred communities in India, with a total population of more than a hundred million people speaking more than three hundred different languages. Although their historical presence is acknowledged by the state and they are lauded as part of India’s ethnic identity, their poverty has been compounded by the suppression of their cultural heritage and lifestyle.

City of Men: Masculinities and Everyday Morality on Public Transport, Romit Chowdhury (Rutgers University Press, August 2023)
City of Men: Masculinities and Everyday Morality on Public Transport, Romit Chowdhury (Rutgers University Press, August 2023)

In South Asian urban landscapes, men are everywhere. And yet we do not seem to know very much about precisely what men do in the city as men. How do men experience gender in city spaces? What are the interactional dynamics between different groups of men on city streets? How do men adjudicate between good and bad conduct in urban spaces?

Mischief of the Gods: Tales from the Ethiopian Streets, Itsushi Kawase, Jeffrey Johnson (trans) (Awai Books, June 2023)
Mischief of the Gods: Tales from the Ethiopian Streets, Itsushi Kawase, Jeffrey Johnson (trans) (Awai Books, June 2023)

This is the first English translation of 2021 Suntory Literary Prize-winning author and visual anthropologist Itsushi Kawase. In this playfully-structured collection of stories and photographs, Kawase journeys from Japan to the Ethiopian streets of Gondar. Join him in Africa where he learns from a diverse cast of characters including local bards, prostitutes, musicians, priests, the homeless, spirit mediums and even a few deceptive guides. This work, translated by Jeffrey Johnson, is sure to surprise and captivate readers.

It helps to come to Islands & Cultures—a collection of essays focusing largely if not exclusively, as goes the subtitle, on “sustainability”—with at least some background on Polynesia, not because such background is necessary to follow the arguments in the various papers, but because otherwise one will be spending a great deal of time on the Internet chasing down one interesting reference after another.

Anyone who has gone even slightly off the beaten track in Southeast Asia is likely to have come across “sea people”, which go by various names: Orang Laut, Sama Bajau, Chao Le, “Sea Gypsies”. These are the people covered in Sea Nomads of Southeast Asia From the Past to the Present, a recently-published collection of (very) academic essays.

Most urban populations in the world are far removed from the unfolding and the consequences of global warming. Therefore, their reflections on global warming tend to revolve around corporate greed, economic policies and the nature of expectations people have from development. In her book, Caring for Glaciers: Land, Animals, and Humanity in the Himalayas, Karine Gagné turns to the community of elderly farmers and herders in Ladakh to understand how they make sense of the melting of the glaciers, a phenomenon directly visible to the people living there. She finds that their responses to questions about the melting of the glaciers invariably involve the words “One day the Pakistanis came …”.